Hoshida H~Akada R, 2013

Pubmed ID 23306636
Title N-Glycosylation deficiency enhanced heterologous production of a Bacillus licheniformis thermostable α-amylase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.
Authors Hisashi Hoshida, Tsuneyasu Fujita, Kamonchai Cha-aim, Rinji Akada
Abstract Expression of foreign enzymes in yeast is a traditional genetic engineering approach; however, useful secretory enzymes are not produced in every case. The hyperthermostable α-amylase encoded by the AmyL gene of Bacillus licheniformis was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae; however, it was only weakly produced and was degraded by the proteasome. To determine the cause of low α-amylase production, AmyL was expressed in a panel of yeast mutants harboring knockouts in non-essential genes. Elevated AmyL production was observed in 44 mutants. The knockout genes were classified into six functional categories. Remarkably, all non-essential genes required for N-linked oligosaccharide synthesis and a gene encoding an oligosaccharyl transferase subunit were identified. Immunoblotting demonstrated that differently underglycosylated forms of AmyL were secreted from oligosaccharide synthesis-deficient mutants, while a fully glycosylated form was produced by wild-type yeast, suggesting that N-linked glycosylation of AmyL inhibited its secretion in yeast. Mutational analysis of six potential N-glycosylation sites in AmyL revealed that the N33Q and N309Q mutations remarkably affected AmyL production. To achieve higher AmyL production in yeast, all six N-glycosylation sites of AmyL were mutated. In wild-type yeast, production of the resulting non-glycosylated form of AmyL was threefold higher than that of the glycosylated form.
Citation Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 2013; 97:5473-82

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